Date of Award

12-2019

Degree Name

MS in Civil and Environmental Engineering

Department

Civil and Environmental Engineering

College

College of Engineering

Advisor

Anurag Pande

Advisor Department

Civil and Environmental Engineering

Advisor College

College of Engineering

Abstract

Located in the heart of Silicon Valley, Downtown San Jose is attracting new residents, visitors, and businesses. Clearly, the mobility of these residents, visitors, and businesses cannot be accommodated by streets that focus on the single-occupancy automobile mode. To increase the potential for individuals to use non-single-occupancy modes of travel, the downtown area must have a cohesive plan to integrate multimodal use and public life. Complete streets are an integral component of the multi-modal transport system and more livable communities. Complete streets refer to roads designed to accommodate multiple modes, users, and activities including walking, cycling, transit, automobile, and nearby businesses and residents. A one-way to two-way street conversion is an example of a complete streets project. Similarly, tactical urbanism can provide cost-effective modifications (e.g., through temporary road closures for events like the farmers’ market) that enrich the public life in an urban environment. The ability to serve current and future transportation needs of residents, businesses and visitors through the creation of pleasant, efficient, and safe multimodal corridors is a guiding principle of a smart city.

This research project addressed questions that guide the implementation of this overarching principle. These questions relate to travel patterns and potential network impacts of the conversion of the corridor(s) into complete streets. Towards that end, core network in downtown San Jose is simulated via a validated VISSIM model for 2015 traffic conditions (i.e., the base case or Scenario 0). Three scenarios are then modeled as variations to this model. The relevant model outputs from the base and scenario models provide easily digestible information the City can convey various impacts and trade-offs to partners and stakeholders prior to implementation of these plans. The scenarios modeled are based on stakeholder input.

Microsimulation allows for detailed modeling and visualization of the transportation networks including movements of individual vehicles and pedestrians. The results based on 2040 traffic volumes provided by the city based on their long-range travel demand model clearly demonstrate that the existing network cannot support the projected level of travel demand. It indicates that the city needs an aggressive travel demand management program to curb the growth of automobile traffic. The output also includes 3-D animations of the traffic flow that can be used in public forums for community outreach. A discussion for such a campaign based on best practices around using these visualizations for public outreach is also provided.

Located in the heart of Silicon Valley, Downtown San Jose is attracting new residents, visitors, and businesses. Clearly, the mobility of these residents, visitors, and businesses cannot be accommodated by streets that focus on the single-occupancy automobile mode. To increase the potential for individuals to use non-single-occupancy modes of travel, the downtown area must have a cohesive plan to integrate multimodal use and public life. Complete streets are an integral component of the multi-modal transport system and more livable communities. Complete streets refer to roads designed to accommodate multiple modes, users, and activities including walking, cycling, transit, automobile, and nearby businesses and residents. A one-way to two-way street conversion is an example of a complete streets project. Similarly, tactical urbanism can provide cost-effective modifications (e.g., through temporary road closures for events like the farmers’ market) that enrich the public life in an urban environment. The ability to serve current and future transportation needs of residents, businesses and visitors through the creation of pleasant, efficient, and safe multimodal corridors is a guiding principle of a smart city.

This research project addressed questions that guide the implementation of this overarching principle. These questions relate to travel patterns and potential network impacts of the conversion of the corridor(s) into complete streets. Towards that end, core network in downtown San Jose is simulated via a validated VISSIM model for 2015 traffic conditions (i.e., the base case or Scenario 0). A number o Threef scenarios are then modeled as variations to this model. The relevant model outputs from the base and scenario models provide easily digestible information the City can convey various impacts and trade-offs to partners and stakeholders prior to implementation of these plans. The scenarios modeled are based on stakeholder input.

Microsimulation allows for detailed modeling and visualization of the transportation networks including movements of individual vehicles and pedestrians. The results based on 2040 traffic volumes provided by the city based on their long-range travel demand model clearly demonstrate that the existing network cannot support the projected level of travel demand. It indicates that the city needs an aggressive travel demand management program to curb the growth of automobile traffic. The output also includes 3-D animations of the traffic flow that can be used in public forums for community outreach. A discussion for such a campaign based on best practices around using these visualizations for public outreach is also provided.

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