Hydronic Service Valve Product Development

Mark Hunsaker, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

Abstract/Summary

Since the inception of modern mechanical and HVAC systems, maintenance and repairs have been prevalent in both contracting and facility operations. The average life of HVAC equipment is fractional compared to the life of buildings as construction technologies improve. Traditionally, the serviceability of heating and cooling equipment has entailed the significant amounts of labor and materials to disruptively drain or freeze hydronic systems in order to cut in means of bypassing the main system, swapping out equipment, or repair. The intent of this project is to explore alternative methods to forgo the aforementioned negative impacts of service and to improve the way systems are maintained. Ultimately, the construction industry and facilities need to invoke mechanical contractors to ask: Is there a better way? What else can improve? The intent of this research is to improve the way systems are maintained. The solution is a valve that can aid in performing service functions without the intensive use of labor and disruption to the facility. The solution is to prevent having to majorly alter a system and its performance through simultaneous isolation, drain, and bypass capabilities. The result is an affordable alternative with an overall greater functionality.