Date of Award

6-2015

Degree Name

MS in Agribusiness

Department

Agribusiness

Advisor

Michael McCullough

Abstract

Hops are one of the four main ingredients used to produce beer. Many studies have been done to analyze the science behind growing and harvesting hops, creating hop hybrids, and how to brew beer with hops. However, there has been little research done revolving around the economic demand and supply model of the hop market. The objectives of this study are to create an econometric model of supply and demand of hops in the United States from 1981 to 2012, and to identify important exogenous variables that explain the supply and demand of hops using the two-stage least squares (2SLS) method of analysis. Using the 2SLS method, the demand model yielded that the US beer production variable is significant at the 10 percent level. For every 1 percent change in US beer production, there will be a 6.25 percent change in quantity of hops demanded in the same direction. The supply model showed that US acreage is significant at the 1 percent level. For every 1 percent change in US acreage, there will be a 0.889 percent change in quantity of hops supplied in the same direction. The implications of this study are viewed in relation to both producers and consumers.

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