Abstract

Synchrotron radiation is a powerful tool used in many fields of science ranging from materials characterization to structural biology. Each year thousands of scientists travel to SLAC to use high-resolution x-rays emitted from a relativistic electron beam circulating in the SPEAR3 synchrotron light source. To characterize the beam size in SPEAR3, we constructed a visible-light interferometer capable of measuring the 22um vertical beam size. The interferometer is located 17m away from the source point and consists of two vertically separated slits. Visible light emitted from the synchrotron passes through the two slits and interferes on a CCD camera to produce an interference pattern. The contrast of the interference pattern is then numerically fit to a model and mathematically translated into a measured value for vertical beam size. For this STAR project, we constructed the interferometer, measured the contrast of the interference pattern as a function of the vertical slit separation, and measured changes in the vertical beam source size while keeping the slit separation fixed.

Disciplines

Optics

Mentor

Jeff Corbett

Lab site

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC)

Funding Acknowledgement

This material is based upon work supported by the S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation and by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0952013. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation or the National Science Foundation. This project has also been made possible with support of the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation. The STAR program is administered by the Cal Poly Center for Excellence in Science and Mathematics Education (CESaME) on behalf of the California State University (CSU)., This material is based upon work supported by the S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation and by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0952013 and Grant No. 0833353. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation or the National Science Foundation. This project has also been made possible with support of the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation. The STAR program is administered by the Cal Poly Center for Excellence in Science and Mathematics Education (CESaME) on behalf of the California State University (CSU)., This material is based upon work supported by the S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation and by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0952013 and Grant No. 0934931. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation or the National Science Foundation. This project has also been made possible with support of the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation. The STAR program is administered by the Cal Poly Center for Excellence in Science and Mathematics Education (CESaME) on behalf of the California State University (CSU).

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URL: http://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/star/178

 

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