Abstract

Two stands in a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation were established in southeastern Louisiana in 1981 at three initial planting densities (1.2 x 1.2m, 2.4 m., and 3.6 x 3.6m). Height, height to the base of the live crown, and DBH measurements taken in consecutive years, coupled with allometric equations, yielded estimates of annual stand level foliage, branchwood, and stemwood biomass increment in each plot. Stemwood, branchwood, first-year foliage, second year foliage, and litter tissues were obtained in each plot and analyzed for nitrogen concentration, and were used to provide estimates of annual foliar nitrogen retranslocation and above-ground nitrogen demands. Also, estimates of relative provide estimates of annual foliar nitrogen retranslocation and above-ground nitrogen demands. Also, estimates of relative fine-root product for two collection periods were obtained in each plot by the coring method. Results indicated that stand density influenced stand-level partitioning to various above-ground component types. As partitioning patterns changed at different levels of stand density, the subsequent demand for nitrogen needed to produce the various components also changed. Changes in above-ground nitrogen demand were subsequently reflected in corresponding changes in fine-root biomass.

Disciplines

Environmental Sciences

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URL: http://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/nrm_fac/35