Date

3-2017

Degree Name

BS in Construction Management

Department

Construction Management Department

Advisor(s)

Phil Barlow

Abstract

The development of a BIM (building information model) model is a standard practice in today’s construction world. While the process of model adoption nearly has a written formula, implementing a BIM model in the midst of a project is a rare occurrence. This paper will examine the implementation of a working BIM model halfway through a public multiple prime contractor project managed by a construction manager (CM) in California. The project cost is roughly $20 million and of moderate complexity. This paper will outline the factors leading up to the ultimate decision of creating a working model, the process of getting all relevant team members involved to create the model, and the final takeaways once the model was finished. The excessive amount of RFI’s and drastic MEP (mechanical, electrical, and plumbing) coordination clashes left the team no choice but to create a model after weighing the cost of the model against potential change orders. The construction manager stepped in to quickly set precedents for model creation responsibilities, utilizing their in-house BIM expert which ended up being invaluable for a variety of reasons. All parties created their specific models within the time frame given, followed by a series of successful BIM coordination meetings featuring all parties involved. Had the construction management firm not been so well versed in technical construction solutions, the model may have been outsourced to a company unfamiliar with the project and team or worse, never suggested at all. Since the CM was also a company that performs general contracting works, their in-house BIM capabilities, project coordination skills, and building knowhow provided the means to escape this potentially costly situation.

Poster Roth WN17.pdf (1273 kB)
Jim Roth Senior Project Poster

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